• Category Archives Expedited Plan Check
  • The Huddle: Permit in a Day

    The Huddle is a process where the entire project team meets with plan review professionals in an extended session, with issues sorted out ‘real time’ and a permit being issued at the end of the process. I understand this approach is being used in Raleigh NC, and Dallas Texas.  From stories I’ve heard, the process in Raleigh is not as streamlined as the process in Dallas,  In Dallas the plans are submitted a couple of weeks prior to the meeting; all the conversations occur in a group setting, and there is a consensus reached and a permit is issued, contingent on final plans coming back in two weeks or less incorporating all agreed on changes.  In Raleigh, the presubmittal is closer to the meeting date; plan review disciplines takes plans to their private workstation for a review; and comments are dealt with one discipline at a time.  I have heard the process in Raleigh can extend over several days; and there is much time by the project team spent waiting.  Both approaches cost several thousand dollars an hour from what I heard – the hourly chargeable rate for all involved staff on the jurisdiction side of the counter.  Nov 2014.  Additional info would be welcome to help clarify details, other locations where the Huddle is being used, and actual costs and time savings realized.

     

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  • Expedited Plan Check

    Expedite based on PROJECT TYPE

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    In many jurisdictions, certain Project Types are given an accellerated plan review

    (such as Green/sustainable; SolarPV; Small additions/remodels; TI’s )

    Expedite based on FEES PAID

    Many jurisdictions offer a Expedited review process for additional fee (which can be justified by overtime for

    regular staff; or contract services).  Some building officials feel that extra charges for faster plan review carries with it some insurmountable baggage, such as the potential that a system may develop which in effect penalizes those projects which do not pay ‘extra’ and the result is slower processing time for the majority of work.

    Do regular track projects suffer when expedited plan review is available?

    Expedite based on incentive Sites for which development is encouraged

     

    Please provide examples of other expedited programs in use in jurisdictions in which you work:

    In many jurisdictions, certain Project Types are given an accellerated plan review (such as Green/sustainable; SolarPV; Small additions/remodels; TI’s )

    Expedite based on FEES PAID

    Many jurisdictions offer a Expedited review process for additional fee (which can be justified by overtime for

    regular staff; or contract services).  Some building officials feel that extra charges for faster plan review carries with it some insurmountable baggage, such as the potential that a system may develop which in effect penalizes those projects which do not pay ‘extra’ and the result is slower processing time for the majority of work.

    Do regular track projects suffer when expedited plan review is available?

    Expedite based on incentive Sites for which development is encouraged

     

    Please provide examples of other expedited programs in use in jurisdictions in which you work:

  • Rolling Review

    Rolling Review

    is the submittal and review of design documents that occurs while the development of the documents is still in process.  This may at first sound unworkable, but it has been proven as a very effective tool for permit processing of  large, complex projects on a tight time line.  To implement it successfully requires a disciplined and scripted plan; otherwise allowing a partially complete drawing package to be submitted would lead to confusion, extra work on the part of all involved, and disappointment.

    I have used Rolling Review on a number of projects successfully, and found the following to be important to success:

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    1. Agreement on the process, expectations, and cost prior to application.  The jurisdiction must be willing to work with this approach, and also must get by-in from the individual plan reviewers if possible.  Getting an understanding of the goals, mutual benefits, and interactive nature of the process is critical to getting any benefit.  Without a clear road map, expectations and buy in, a rolling review can become a frustrating waste of time, money and paper.
    2. Each discipline’s submittals MUST be accompanied with a written narrative, which consists of a concise but detailed description of the current status of the drawings (a spreadsheet works well for this) and a description of specifically what the plan reviewer is being asked to look at.  A list of particular questions is helpful.  Example:  Review the grade plan calculation method and results.  Review the method used to establish ‘average roof height’ above the grade plan.  Review the occupancy separation analysis and conclusions.  Without a detailed direction, a plan review might consist of one line: “application too incomplete for review”.
    3. Ability of plan preparers and plan reviewers to discuss the submittals during the review process.

    Large projects which I have tracked using this technique included the Globe Mills; which turned an urban ruin, long abandoned grain mill into a transit oriented mixed use /mixed income development on a tightly scripted timeline dictated by Housing Tax Credit financing; (called the largest and most complex historic adaptive reuse in the Sacramento Region); the adaptive reuse of the National Register six story city block sized Hotel Stockton in downtown Stockton Ca, and the currently underway WAL in Sacramento which is also a six story full city block sized adaptive reuse and expansion of a national register abandoned warehouse property.  More on these projects here: www.appliedarts.net

     

     

    One thought on “Rolling Review”

    1. mfmalinowskiPost author
      Excellent method to short circuit the problems of bin time and multiple plan check cycles. More work for the design team, but cuts month off the normal plan processing time for a complex large project.