• Category Archives Administrative
  • PASS in action: Share your experiences

    From: Helmer, Mike
    Sent: Thursday, March 15, 2018 9:18 AM
    To: Mike Malinowski
    Subject: RE: PASS (Prequalified Architectural Submittal System) Project

    Hello Mike,

    Here’s the update I promised for this PASS project.

    The second review when very smooth and resulted with one remaining item requested by the City on March 8, 2018.  Evidently there was a little confusion with our suggested format for the Green Code Checklist.  Plan sheets that included the revised checklists were resubmitted to the City on March 14, 2018 and approved for issuance the same day.

    All in all, the project was submitted on January 17, 2018 and ready to issue on March 14, 2018.  That’s a total of 38 business days.  The plans were under City review for less than 14 of those days.

    I would say both parties performed well on this one.

    Thanks,

    Michael T. Helmer
    Senior Building Plans Examiner
    Development Services Department

    Building Division

    Working together to build a quality community.


    Civic Center | 311 Vernon Street | Roseville, CA | 95678

    From: Helmer, Mike
    Sent: Thursday, February 08, 2018 7:32 AM
    Subject: RE: PASS (Prequalified Architectural Submittal System) Project

     Mike,

    This project, like many Kaiser projects, was highly detailed.  The first review was started 3 business days after its submittal and took 6 business days to complete.  Remember, the City has combination plans examiners, who review each project for all disciplines.

    Our plans examiner reports that the design documents met the standards expected for a PASS project, which resulted in a marked reduction in the number of plan review comments likely for a project of this level.

    The design team is working on the issues and should resubmit soon.

    I’ll let you know how the recheck went, once complete.

    Thanks,

    Michael T. Helmer
    Senior Building Plans Examiner
    Development Services Department

    Building Division

    Working together to build a quality community.

    Civic Center | 311 Vernon Street | Roseville, CA | 95678


  • The Huddle: Permit in a Day

    The Huddle is a process where the entire project team meets with plan review professionals in an extended session, with issues sorted out ‘real time’ and a permit being issued at the end of the process. I understand this approach is being used in Raleigh NC, and Dallas Texas.  From stories I’ve heard, the process in Raleigh is not as streamlined as the process in Dallas,  In Dallas the plans are submitted a couple of weeks prior to the meeting; all the conversations occur in a group setting, and there is a consensus reached and a permit is issued, contingent on final plans coming back in two weeks or less incorporating all agreed on changes.  In Raleigh, the presubmittal is closer to the meeting date; plan review disciplines takes plans to their private workstation for a review; and comments are dealt with one discipline at a time.  I have heard the process in Raleigh can extend over several days; and there is much time by the project team spent waiting.  Both approaches cost several thousand dollars an hour from what I heard – the hourly chargeable rate for all involved staff on the jurisdiction side of the counter.  Nov 2014.  Additional info would be welcome to help clarify details, other locations where the Huddle is being used, and actual costs and time savings realized.

     

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  • Permit Nightmares

    You asked for nightmares as well. In the city in which I practice the inspector makes any new commercial enterprise file for a building permit, including drawings and a Construction Control Affidavit even when no work is being done…literally.  As an example, a professional wanted to rent a single office. The inspector made him get a drawing from me of the office (8′ x 12′) and show where he intended to put his desk and chair.  The tenant had to apply for a building permit with my stamped drawing and Construction Control Affidavit, was charged the minimum permit fee, and then could apply for a Certificate of Occupancy.

    It is a steady stream of work for me if I choose to take it, but I’d much prefer to spend my time on “real” projects.
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    John Crowell
    Deer Hill Architects, LLC
    Peabody MA

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